161) DALEK

30 April 2005

Viewing Figures: 8.63M

Plot

The Doctor and Rose arrive in an underground museum where Henry Van Statten has the last of the Daleks kept in a vault

Cast

Christopher Eccleston (The Doctor), Billie Piper (Rose Tyler), Steven Beckingham (Polkowski), Corey Johnson (Henry Van Statten)

Anna-Louise Plowman (Goddard), Bruno Langley (Adam), Nigel Whitmey (Simmons), John Schwab (Bywater)

Jane Carpenter (De Maggio), Joe Montana (Commander), Barnaby Edwards (Dalek), Nicholas Briggs (Dalek Voice)

Crew

Robert Sherman (Writer), Phil Collinson (Producer), Joe Ahearne (Director), Daleks originally created by Terry Nation 

Gareth Williams (1st Assistant Director), Sean Clayton (2nd Assistant Director), Dan Mumford (3rd Assistant Director)

Lowri Thomas (Location Manager), Jess van Niekerk (Production Co-ordinator)

Debi Griffiths, Kath Blackman (A/Production Accountants), Pam Humphreys (Continuity), Helen Raynor (Script Editor)

Martin Stephens (Camera Operator), Mark Isaac (Focus Puller), John Robinson (Grip), Damian Richardson (Boom Operator)

Mark Hutchings (Gaffer), Peter Chester (Best Boy), Lee Sheward (Stunt Co-ordinator)

Stuart Clarke, Derek Lea, Neil Finnigan, Tony Lucken (Stunt Performers), Gwenllian Llwyd (Art Department Co-ordinator)

Bryan Hitch (Concept Artist), Catherine Samuel (Production Buyer), Liz Griffiths (Set Decorator)

Stephen Nicholas (Supervising Art Director), Julian Luxton (Standby Art Director), Adrian Anscombe (Property Master)

Andrew Smith (Construction Manager), Phil Shellard, Tristan Howell (Standby Props), Jenny Bowers (Graphic Artist)

Yolanda Peart-Smith (Wardrobe Supervisor), Linda Davie (Make-Up Supervisor), Claire Pritchard, Steve Williams (Make-Up Artists)

Kirsty Robertson (Casting Associate), Ceres Doyle (Assistant Editor), Marie Brown (Post Production Supervisor)

Matthew Clarke (On Line Editor), Kai van Beers (Colourist), Simon C Holden, David Bowman, Jennifer Herbert (2D VFX Artists)

Chris Petts, Mark Wallman, Andy Howell (3D VFX Artists), Alex Fort (Digital Matte Painter), Mike Tucker (Model Unit Supervisor)

Peter Jeffreys (Dubbing Mixer), Paul McFadden (Dialogue Editor), Paul Jefferies (Sound FX Editor), James Dundas (Rights Executive)

Richard Pugsley (Finance Manager), Ron Grainer (Original Theme Music), Andy Pryor CDG (Casting Director)

Endaf Emyr Williams (Production Accountant), Ian Richardson (Sound Recordist), Lucinda Wright (Costume Designer)

Davy Jones (Make-Up Designer), Murray Gold (Music), The Mill (Visual Effects), Will Cohen (Visual FX Producer)

Dave Houghton (Visual FX Supervisor), Any Effects (Special Effects), Millennium Effects (Prosthetics), Graham Walker (Editor)

Edward Thomas (Production Designer), Ernic Vincze BSC (Director of Photography), Tracie Simpson (Production Manager)

Helen Vallis (Associate Producer), Russell T Davies, Julie Gardner, Mal Young (Executive Producers)

Uncredited Crew

Dan Mumford (1st Assistant Director), Daffyd Parry (3rd Assistant Director), Clive Evans, Llyr Morris (Location Managers), Joss Lowe

Paul Edwards, Peter Thornton (Camera Operators), Terry Bartlett (Focus Puller), Rhydian Yeoman, Catherine Ayres (Boom Operators)

Broadcast

Filming Locations

  • National Museum of Wales, Museum Place, Cardiff

  • Millennium Stadium, Westgate Street, Cardiff

  • UNIT Q2, Imperial Way, Newport

Deaths

  • Simmons [skull crushed by the Dalek]

  • Bywater [exterminated by the Dalek]

  • De Maggio [exterminated by the Dalek]

  • Commander [electrocued]

  • Base Guards [exterminated]

  • Dalek [blows itself up]

Production Days

  • 14 days between Monday 25 October - Friday 26 November 2004

Production Errors

  1. When Rose fails to make it beyond the bulkhead door, the Dalek shouts exterminate and fires its weapon. However, when the episode returns to the same scene, no scorch marks can be seen anywhere. When the Dalek fires its weapon twice on either side of Rose, two scorch marks appear on the wall

  2. Rose claims she would be 26 in 2012. During Rose it's stated that she is 19. Since Rose is set in 2005, Rose's birth year would be 1986 - so Rose is correct. However, she is actually incorrect. Father's Day is set in Autumn 1987 when Rose was no more than a baby. In Rise of the Cybermen, The Doctor says that Rose's father died when she was 6 months old. This means that Rose was born in 1987, making her 25 in 2012. 

Working Titles

  • Creature of Lies

  • Return of the Daleks

  • The Sphere

Verdict

How could new series mess up, bringing back one of Doctor Who's most recognised creatures? They don't, especially with this episode. From start to middle-act to climax, there is very little wrong with this forty-five-minute thriller. The sole Dalek bent on continuing its prime directive is a thing of beauty throughout. From its release to regeneration to scenes where it massacres a billionaire's henchmen, and aides are all edited, paced, acting and shot in ways almost unimaginable. The scenes of the Dalek's release as it snaps its chains in half with little to no effort creates a scene of wonder. Followed by killing its torturer within seconds is only just the beginning where the Dalek shows off its true colours. The corridor scene with the helpless soldiers being massacred in quick concession only adds to the Dalek's previous scene. The CGI shots of fired bullets melting away before they hit the evil identity, the Dalek's midsection moving one hundred and eighty degrees, its POV (point-of-view shots) puts viewers right into the action on the screen. The silent shots of the dead soldiers to the music, reaching a crescendo as The Dalek s-l-o-w-l-y and silently moves away adds to the terrifying factor one Dalek can pose. As we move to the stair scene, it would seem the Dalek is defeated; no more harm can be done. But of course, the Dalek has a smart trick up its sleeve. First of all, the timing is perfect. Robert Shearman's script allows the antagonist time and breathing space to assess its surroundings. The slow panning and POV shots of the Dalek along with its blank stare at the three escapees to its ultimate and flawless line delivery from the talented Nicholas Briggs only adds to the sheer brilliance of the episode. As the Dalek raises slowly over the stairs it comes to light that nothing can stop it. Lastly, the killing zone scene is, without a doubt, possibly the best scenes in the revived series. Again the slow gliding Dalek and its POV shots only make you want to watch more. The hovering Dalek carefully and accurately planning its next move adds to its god-like image. The falling sprinkler water to the ultimate demise of the Van Statten's personnel is beautiful and jaw-dropping at the same time. As the music fades out to a quiet volume, the shots of Dalek's victims only makes the serial better. The so-called dispensable men as Van Statten calls them to his rich, arrogant and corrupt personality shows that power does indeed buy survival. When a Dalek backs him against the wall his childish tear-filled eyes makes him nothing more than a weak little man. Having Van Statten shrouded in darkness at various points highlights his pure dark, selfish personality polishes off this story. The scene where the Dalek finally opens up to reveal the actual Dalek creature inside is awe-inspiring. The ray of sunlight hitting its face to its tiny tentacle reaching up shows that even the evilest of all beings can have some good in them. Rose has her best moment in the serial here where she defends the child-like creature from the aggressive, aggravated Doctor. Eccleston also shines as The Doctor who realises that not even he can kill a member of his arch-enemy's race in cold blood. Billie Piper gives another excellent performance. Her reaction and compassion towards the damaged, lonely and scared Dalek can indeed bring a tear to the eye. Nicholas' lose and weak line deliveries can make the heart break to see such a fantastic creature going through so much pain. A great American and Canadian born cast, a wonderous and owe inspiring villain makes, a fantastic performance from Billie Piper makes this serial indeed of the all-time greats.  Just ignore the short scene where Rose and Adam are supposedly a thing. *****